Archive for the ‘Open Course’ Category

Hey MERLOT, “Can you hear me?”

September 20, 2017

So you’re looking for OERs and don’t know how to do it.  I’ve written about this elsewhere in this blog –  it’s not hard to find OERs these days, especially as repositories, ostensibly like MERLOT’s, are popping up all over the Web.  More and more, as OERs become the essential building blocks of course content, it will be easy to search for them, but not so easy to find the ‘right stuff.’   But…

… with Siri and Cortana now inhabiting our phones, tablets, and computers, and with the likes of Alexa and Google Assistant invading our homes, it won’t be uncommon for instructors to engage MERLOT in dialogues like the following, between Kelly, an instructor, and MERLOT:

KELLY: Hi MERLOT; I need OERs for a new course that’s been assigned to me.  Can you help me?

MERLOT: Hi Kelly.  I’d be pleased to.  Is this a search we’ve done before, or a new one?

Kelly:  A new one.

MERLOT:  OK. Please tell me more about the course.  For example, what’s the academic discipline, what grade level, etc.?

KELLY: It’s a freshman math course.

MERLOT: Is this for high school or college?

KELLY: It’s college level.

MERLOT: Are there any specific math topics that you will covering in the course?

KELLY:  It’s essentially an introduction to calculus

MERLOT:  I presume you would like the OERs for your intro calculus freshman course to be in English

KELLY:  Yes

MERLOT:  Do you want these OERs to be available only for mobile devices

KELLY:  No.

MERLOT: Do you have any preference for the kinds of OERs you want?

KELLY: What do you mean by the kind of OER?

MERLOT: I mean things like e-texts, online courses, animations, etc.  Or I could show you a list of all the possibilities.

KELLY:  I would like only e-texts and animations.

MERLOT:  Any particular format for the e-texts and animations?

KELLY:  What kinds of formats are there?

MERLOT:  For e-texts the most popular are PDF and Microsoft Word.  I could show you a list of all the possibilities.  For animations there are lots of possibilities.

KELLY:  PDFs for the texts, and just find animation OERs.  I will pick what I want.

MERLOT: Will you want to modify or customize any of the materials?

KELLY: I’d like the option to do that.

MERLOT: Do you care if the materials have a cost associated with them?

KELLY: Yes. I’d like them to free.

MERLOT:  OK.  I will search all relevant OER sources, starting with my own repository which is far and away the best one available, and then I’ll generate a list for you. I will display that list, including relevant hyperlinks here, and if you want, I can also email the list to you.

… Pause for a second or two …

MERLOT: I’ve found 44 e-texts and 54 animations in the MERLOT collection.  If you like, I can broaden the search to other relevant collections and even to the World Wide Web.  Would you like me to do that?

KELLY:  No. Just show me the MERLOT list.

MERLOT (Displays the 98 items):  Is there anything else you need now?

KELLY: No thanks

MERLOT: Would you like me to save this search?

KELLY:  Yes please.

MERLOT:  OK, it’s saved. Next time, just ask me retrieve your last “math” search. Talk to you later Kelly.

KELLY:  Thanks, MERLOT. I can’t imagine what I’d do without you!

 

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Get Off Your Duff and Use The Google

September 21, 2016

I am tired of reading reports of surveys of instructors who are asked if they know what OERs are and whether or not they use them.  I’m also tired of reading that people who know what they are don’t use them because they don’t know where to find them, they don’t know if what they find is any good, or a million other silly excuses.

First of all, if your colleagues don’t know what OERs are (and I’m assuming if you’re reading this, that you do), then they are either retired on the job, or they should be.  I can’t understand how anyone these days doesn’t know what OERs are.  They are reported on everywhere – including the popular media – except maybe on media like Entertainment Tonight, who only talk about the Kardashians – whatever they are.

About a year ago I set up a Google Alert to send me emails when Google picks up a press comment about OERs.   I get at least one email daily showing me press reports that somehow refer to OERs – in the US, almost exclusively talking about the adoption of free e-texts.

After all these years since OER has been around, and after all the education that most of our colleagues  have, it’s a mystery to me that some of them don’t know what OERs are, where to find them, or how to know if they’re any good or not.   Haven’t they ever heard of “the Google?”

This business about where do you find OERs, is ridiculous.  All you have to do is type “OER collections into the Google search bar.  Guess how many hits you get?  I just got 379,000 hits while I’m writing this blog.

Now there’s the question of how good or how bad OERs might be.  Even that’s an easy one to discover.  If an OER collection is legitimate, like MERLOT that has been around for almost 20 years, where there are lots of reviews and user ratings, it’s easy to say what’s good and what’s not good.

I think the only reason that people don’t use OER is that they are just simply too lazy to change how they’ve been teaching for however long they’ve been teaching.  If instructors are really interested in doing the best job for their students, they have an obligation to learn more and to use OERs.

 

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Is it Really Open?

November 26, 2013

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If you are reading this blog, you probably know a fair bit about the concept of “openness.” You may even think that an “open” item is something that you can find online that is free, and available for your use, and even for your reuse. By “reuse” I mean that you think you can change it and then “reuse” it for your teaching or research needs.

Well, that may or may not be true. In fact, the word “open” can be used in a number of contexts. For example, when we talk about “open source,” we are explicitly referring to software. Moodle, the learning management system (LMS) is an example of open source software. The source code is available for you to reuse, modify, etc. as you wish. Of course there can be other conditions related to open source software, but that is beyond the scope of this blog.

Then there is the term “Open Access.” Open Access is a movement that concerns the publication of free, online journals, journal articles, and textbooks. Material published under an Open Access policy is generally freely available for you to access without having to subscribe to a publication, or even join a society that publishes such publications. The Open Access movement started as a result of demand by various research communities to allow government-funded research to be freely available since the public (taxpayers) had already paid for it. The Open Access movement has been extended beyond journals and journal articles to now include textbooks. You should note however, that just because something is Open Access doesn’t mean it doesn’t have a copyright. In fact, such materials continue to be owned (copyrighted) by the author, the publisher, or both. And if you cite material from an Open Access publication, it must be cited in exactly the same manner as if the material were from a traditional publication.

Finally we have Open Education Resources (OERs). This is a term that was first defined more than 10 years ago at a Hewlett foundation-supported UNESCO conference, and it concerns online learning materials, sometimes called learning objects. Hewlett defines OERs as:

OER (sic) are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge. (For more information, visit http://www.hewlett.org/programs/education-program/open-educational-resources)

From a practical sense, OER’s generally have a license that indicates what you can and cannot do with them. Creative Commons (CC) licensing (www.creativecommons.org) defines six possible licenses that an OER can carry. Depending on the license, they may or may not be free, and you may or may not alter them. It all depends on what the owner of the OER declares in the CC license.

The MERLOT collection (www.merlot.org) is unique in that it contains a wide selection of open materials, many of them carrying a Creative Commons license. The materials include Open Access articles, Open Access textbooks, open journal articles and OER’s. The MERLOT OER’s include learning materials as” microscopic” as simulations or animations that can be embedded by an instructor into an online course, through to complete online courses.

It’s really easy to search MERLOT II for all or any open texts, open courses, and OER’s, with and without Creative Commons licenses. I urge you to visit www.merlot.org, click on the Search tile, and explore our Advanced Search functions. While you’re at it, you might check out our Search Other Libraries tile) which allows you to search more than 20 other libraries of learning materials, all at the same time. Remember, if you’re looking for free textbooks, you want to look for the category “open texts.” Or, for free courses, look for “open courseware.” And if you need more guidance in how to do this, you can visit the new context-sensitive Help part of our new MERLOT, or you can email the webmaster at webmaster@merlot.org.

Happy hunting!

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