Archive for the ‘Higher Ed’ Category

Get Off Your Duff and Use The Google

September 21, 2016

I am tired of reading reports of surveys of instructors who are asked if they know what OERs are and whether or not they use them.  I’m also tired of reading that people who know what they are don’t use them because they don’t know where to find them, they don’t know if what they find is any good, or a million other silly excuses.

First of all, if your colleagues don’t know what OERs are (and I’m assuming if you’re reading this, that you do), then they are either retired on the job, or they should be.  I can’t understand how anyone these days doesn’t know what OERs are.  They are reported on everywhere – including the popular media – except maybe on media like Entertainment Tonight, who only talk about the Kardashians – whatever they are.

About a year ago I set up a Google Alert to send me emails when Google picks up a press comment about OERs.   I get at least one email daily showing me press reports that somehow refer to OERs – in the US, almost exclusively talking about the adoption of free e-texts.

After all these years since OER has been around, and after all the education that most of our colleagues  have, it’s a mystery to me that some of them don’t know what OERs are, where to find them, or how to know if they’re any good or not.   Haven’t they ever heard of “the Google?”

This business about where do you find OERs, is ridiculous.  All you have to do is type “OER collections into the Google search bar.  Guess how many hits you get?  I just got 379,000 hits while I’m writing this blog.

Now there’s the question of how good or how bad OERs might be.  Even that’s an easy one to discover.  If an OER collection is legitimate, like MERLOT that has been around for almost 20 years, where there are lots of reviews and user ratings, it’s easy to say what’s good and what’s not good.

I think the only reason that people don’t use OER is that they are just simply too lazy to change how they’ve been teaching for however long they’ve been teaching.  If instructors are really interested in doing the best job for their students, they have an obligation to learn more and to use OERs.

 

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2016 – The Year of OERs?  Don’t Kid Yourself.

January 13, 2016

If you think 2016 is the year of OERs, you are probably deluding yourself.  Every January for the last 14 years, OER evangelists have thought, “This is it – the year of OERs!  Finally.” And why not?  Why shouldn’t it be?  After all, all we’re trying to do is give instructors and students free and high quality learning and teaching materials that will help them to teach and to learn better.  Why wouldn’t anyone want this?

Well, the reality seems to be that 1) people simply don’t believe that OERs are really free, or 2) they think that what they find in repositories just isn’t as good as what publishers produce, or 3) they delusionally believe that they can make better stuff themselves.  Those of us who have been working in the OER “industry” for a long time understand that none of this is true.  OER’s really are free; they may or may not be as good as what publishers produce; and most people are amateurs when it comes to creating effective online teaching and learning materials. But the truth is, you can get OER’s for free!

But the real drawback to more widespread use of OERs is that people simply don’t have time to change what they’ve always been doing.  That means that while they may silently recognize the fallacies in their objections, they really can’t be bothered to explore the value of OERs.

So what can we do to convince people to change their behavior and to do that which is good for them and their students?  Probably nothing.  The situation will not change until mandates and dictates are issued by administrators who recognize the benefits of OERs, in terms of quality and in terms of cost effectiveness, to promote OER use and reward OER users.

In the meantime, we evangelists have to keep doing what we’re doing so that when the time finally comes we can say, “I told you so.”

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